Wednesday, December 09, 2009

A letter by a Malaysian in the USA

I am a female Chinese Malaysian, living in the Washington DC area in the United States . I have read many of the letters that often talk about foreign countries when the writers have no real knowledge of actually living in those countries.

Many draw conclusions about what those countries are like after hearing it from someone else or by reading and hearing about them in the media or after four years in a college town in those countries.

I finished STPM with outstanding results from the prestigious St George's Girls School in Penang . Did I get a university place from the Malaysian government? Nothing. With near perfect scores, I had nothing, while my Malay friends were getting offers to go overseas.

Even those with 2As got into university. I was so depressed. I was my parent's last hope for getting the family out of poverty and at 18, I thought I had failed my parents.

Today, I understand it was the Malaysian Government that had failed me and my family because of its iscriminatory policies.

Fortunately, I did not give up and immediately did research at the Malaysian American Commission on Education Exchange (MACEE) to find a university in the US that would accept me and provide all the finances. My family and
friends thought I was crazy, being the youngest of nine children of a very poor carpenter. Anything that required a fee was out of our reach.

Based on merit and my extracurricular activities of community service in secondary school, I received full tuition scholarship, work study, and grants to cover the four years at a highly competitive US university.

Often, I took 21 credits each semester, 15 credits each term while working 20 hours each week and maintaining a 3.5 CGPA. A couple of semesters, I also received division scholarships and worked as a TA (teaching assistant) on top of everything else.

For the work study, I worked as a custodian (yes, cleaning toilets), carpet layer, computer lab assistant, grounds keeping, librarian, painter, tour guide, etc. If you understand the US credit system, you will understand this is a heavy load.

Why did I do it? This is because I learnt as a young child from my parents that hard work is an opportunity, to give my best in everything, and to take pride in the work I do. I walked away with a double major and a minor with honours but most of all a great lesson in humility and a great respect for those who are forced to labour in so-called `blue collar' positions.

Those of you who think you know all about Australia , US, or the West, think again. Unless you have really lived in these countries, i.e. paid a mortgage, paid taxes, taken part in elections, you do not understand the level of commitment and hard work it takes to be successful in these countries, not just for immigrants but for people who have lived here for generations.

These people are where they are today because of hard work. (Of course, I am not saying everyone in the US is hardworking.. There is always the lazy lot which lives off of someone else's hard work. Fortunately, they are the
minority..)

Every single person, anywhere, should have the opportunity to succeed if they want to put in the effort and be accountable for their own actions. In the end, they should be able to reap what they sow.

It is bearable that opportunities are limited depending on how well-off financially one's family is but when higher education opportunities are race-based, like it is in Malaysia ; it is downright cruel for those who see education as the only way out of poverty.

If you want to say discrimination is here in the US , yes, of course it is. Can you name a country where it doesn't happen? But let me tell you one thing - if you go looking for it, you will find it. But in Malaysia , you don't have to go look for it because it seeks you out, slaps you in your face every which way you turn, and is sanctioned by law
!

Here in the US , my children have the same opportunity to go to school and learn just like their black, white, and immigrant friends. At school, they eat the same food, play the same games, are taught the same classes and when they are 18, they will still have the same opportunities. would I want to bring my children back to Malaysia ? So they can suffer the state-sanctioned discrimination as the non-malays have for over 50 years?

The injustice the non-Malay have to suffer in frightening silence is the most damaging problem one has to face throughout one's life. You just have to look at the mighty govt structures which completely favours only one race, the Umno Malay. The Chinese and Indians are treated no better than the illegal Indonesians. Racism and corruption are openly practised by the Malay politicians everywhere, Courts, schools/Uni, police, govt offices, contracts, GLC, NEP, ISA, local govt.

It's so powerful and intimidating that you walk with fear and keep your mouth shut on anything and everything political. Religion is taboo unless you talk good about Islam. As for being a slave in the foreign country, I am a happy 'slave' earning a good income as an IT project manager.

I work five days a week; can talk bad about the president when I want to; argue about politics, race and religion openly; gather with more than 50 friends and family when I want (no permit needed) and I don't worry about the police pulling me over because they say I ran the light when I didn't.

Have we seen the light at the end of the tunnel yet (Anwar Ibrahim)? Or is it the head light of an oncoming Umno train ? Lets hope its the former for the sake of all fair minded Malaysians.

The dream of a Malaysian 'race' in the future is nowhere in sight with the present BN govt. Where is Negara-Ku???

65 comments:

HuiHui said...

hhhhuuuuaaaaa.......impressed!!!!!!!!!

ck said...

"you don't have to go look for it because it seeks you out, slaps you in your face every which way you turn, and is sanctioned by law!"

huibee said...

ya HuiHui.. well written right!

thats my favourite part ck..
i was like "O.O TRUEEEE" when i read that

Anonymous said...

i have clicked the "like" button......

Peng

terrorgen said...

I am impressed in how heavy-loaded her school life was...
I personally cannot do it...

Anyways, this is really TRUE! And that's my favourite quote as well!

I am going to put it in my blog too...

Parody of Bolehland said...

My cousin in the US of A sent me your link. Congratulations to you and read my blog on your blog here http://yah-meh.blogspot.com/2010/01/malaysian-in-usa.html
Wishing you a Happy New Year and every success to you and your loved ones. Keep on your good work.

huibee said...

Thanks a lot.
I hope people are aware that this is not a letter written by me, as I got this from mail and couldn't find the source, yet I'm so impressed and strongly agree with what she said, thus sharing the letter without the source.

Happy New Year to you too. (=

BeenThere said...

Hi, sometimes you read it from these "so called migrated overseas" people and assume everything they tell you is the truth. I think some of you should actually go there and find out how "happy" you would be besides material things, there is nothing much to shout about living in usa. In fact it can be psychological torture for some.

Ask yourself these questions:

1. Do you try to change your accent everytime you speak to an American and feel embarrass with your "funny" accent?

2. Do you get to be Top Management (CEO almost always look white) even if you try hard enough?

3. How many business opportunities are there for an immigrant? How many sectors are there for them besides a nerdy computer job or accountant ? Any asian immigrants in construction business? Manufacturing? Hi-Tech? F&B? (besides chinese take-out restaurants)

4. Do you hang out in all places normally reserved for whites i.e. high-end restaurants. Do you feel comfy sitting there? do you try hard to blend in? can you eat with your hands without feeling embarass?

5. How about prospects of finding friends? Limited group of friends in common? Or perhaps only few and far in between? Lonely life there? Struggle to adapt to others culture? Pressured to assimilate or face embarassment?


I have been there, hated it, and now I am back in Malaysia.

I can walk into any cafe, bistro, shopping mall, club, restaurant in any remote area of Malaysia and still feel like I belong here.

Of i'm chinese malaysian and this is the country I feel most comfortable living in.

5.

huibee said...

Thanks a lot for your comment BeenThere. Unfortunately I've never been there, but I have been staying in the UK for 4 years. The reason I was sharing this letter was simple, it's very true about what's going on in Malaysia, would you deny that? Of course, for me, like how I always tell my friends, I'd definitely go back to Malaysia eventually, and I love Malaysia far more that any western countries. I noticed the 5 points that you mentioned too. And yet, for me, it's entirely different reasons of why we still prefer Malaysia more than USA or UK etc. Because, we couldn't deny that what she said about Malaysia is true, that you get discriminations every where which is sanctioned by law, the reason we can still be so comfortably staying there, is probably that we're so well trained and are now used to all those unfair treatments and discriminations, and more ironically, we probably are proud of being part of it, as it makes us stronger and more competitive.

I hope you get what I mean. I do agree with you that as an Asian immigrant, living in those so called developed western countries are not as good as most people can imagine unless you 've spent years there, and yet, hmm Malaysia is still Malaysia, with all those injustice and problems, it's still Malaysia that we love. =)

Anonymous said...

I am an American of Indian origin who has many friends from Malaysia and the letter you posted is a fact which I have heard so many times from my Malaysian friends of Chinese and Indian when I was school. The poster who asks the 5 questions, well to answer to your question you need to look at the Indian and Chinese immigrants who are very successful.

1. We do not need to put a phony accent with our American colleagues.

2.Easy just look at Indra Nooyi who leads PepsiCo or Sanjay Jha of Motorola or Shantanu Narayen of Adobe Systems. All these people are immigrants who are at the top most echelons and will serve as role model for future immigrants.

3. America in one word means "land of opportunity" Anyone can be successful as long he is hardworking and enterprising. Americans of Indian origin own about 40% of all the motels in US. There is no area which is barred for an immigrant to work unlike in Malaysia where there is a state sponsored bias.

4. There is nothing embarassing for me to go to Morton's or any other high end places. Infact Asian Americans are among the highest earning group, even higher than the whites. For that matter Americans of Asian Indian descent account for the second highest income after the Jewish people.

5. There is no pressure to assimilate you automatically do it meet your children's friends and get to know their parents. The colleagues at work are quite close so no pressure what so ever.

I can do what I want and guaranteed that my children will get the best opportunity to succeed.

sushiking said...

do u remember the link you have for this blog? Would you mind send it to me?

huibee said...

I got this letter through an email. Not from a blog.

nifty errotic stories said...
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Anonymous said...

Hi, I read your post and I thought it was interesting. I am actually a Malaysian studying here in the US. You were saying something about how you got financial aid from Macee. honestly i have never heard of Macee. What kind of financial aid do they offer? Is it like a loan or is it a scholarship? How do i apply for it? Can i still apply for it eventhough i am already an enrolled student?

Anonymous said...

Excellent message from another well deserved hard working Chinese Malaysian who is living her good life in foreign country because of our unfair government policy. I am one of them, I have been in US since 1995. In many occasions, I thought about moving back to Malaysia so I can be closer to my family and friends. But every time, I read or heard news about our unfair government policy...it shuts down my moving back idea. I don't know how many of us living in foreign countries? I'm confident that we all are very good at whatever we are doing. Have you ever thought how successful Malaysia would be if we all are living in Malaysia? I don't know about you...but I feel guilty from abandoning our country and family. If we all really want to see the "change" in our Malaysia government policy, we better play our role and help our own.

stone rain said...

ohhh please don't sounds so sad. most chinese in malaysia, even indian live in wealthy condition. even a malay who so-called "protected" by a law sometime eat a cup of rice once a day because live in poor condition. it is easy for you to say because you're come from a sad and poor family, although that many from your races are rich. you need to blame to your own races because not helping your family at first. not to blame other religions, races, or a government. your own races dominate many sectors and business field, so i don't see a discrimination caused by other religions or a government.

well, since you're now an american, you should prepare your own graveyard in american soil since you're now truly american ;)

Anonymous said...

Hi BeenThere,

I am not quite agreed what you said as below,

1. Do you try to change your accent everytime you speak to an American and feel embarrass with your "funny" accent?
- This is because our English is poor.We are learning to speak real "English" as we can not do it in Malaysia, agree?

2. Do you get to be Top Management (CEO almost always look white) even if you try hard enough?
- I am a Senior R&D Manager in one of Medical Device Company in UK for almost 3.5 years as I am a Malaysian.

3. How many business opportunities are there for an immigrant? How many sectors are there for them besides a nerdy computer job or accountant ? Any asian immigrants in construction business? Manufacturing? Hi-Tech? F&B? (besides chinese take-out restaurants)
- Yes, I see quite a lot of well educated or graduated engineers from China, Malaysia, Singapore or Hongkong around. Mostly, they are in Manufacturing, Design Center and there are 3 Malaysian who are working in my company now (Excluded me).

4. Do you hang out in all places normally reserved for whites i.e. high-end restaurants. Do you feel comfy sitting there? do you try hard to blend in? can you eat with your hands without feeling embarass?
- No,need to ask yourself 'Why you need to hang out those high-end restaurants as you said. I am not sure which country are you with? But, Health and Safetly rules are very important in UK so we dont eat with our hands :)

I have been there, hated it, and now I am back in Malaysia.
- From what I can see, maybe you are jealous ppl who is working aborad as you dont have any opp. to work aboard or you are not qualified to work here.

5. How about prospects of finding friends? Limited group of friends in common? Or perhaps only few and far in between? Lonely life there? Struggle to adapt to others culture? Pressured to assimilate or face embarassment?
- If you are willing spend your extra time hanging around, I dont think you are not able to get friends or having lonely life.

Sue said...

I stumbled across this blog while I was simply googling around and I must say it's an excellent post. I absolutely agree with you huibee. P.S. I graduated from St George too and will be moving to US soon.

Also, as for what BeenThere said,my advise is that you should not spend all your time focusing on the negative aspects. I mean come on! There's so many other great things going on in the US that you can't get here in Malaysia! For goodness sake be a lil positive. The Americans are great and they're more friendly than Malaysians are to each other.
I seriously laughed so hard when I read the first part of your comment about the funny accent. I've been stressing on this matter with practically everyone I know.Here's my take on it... when you speak really good English, your speech becomes really fluent and it actually sounds like you're putting on an accent but you aren't. The only funny accent that I know is definitely The MALAYSIAN accent of bad horrible English. I struggle every time I've got to speak to a Malaysian, as I've gotta put on a "fake malaysian accent" to make them understand me better.

As for concluding your whole comment, you're basically pointing out racism in the US. However, let me ask you, do u know a single country out there that doesn't have this? I remember speaking to one of my American friend about this matter (he holds a high post in a company and yes he is white) and he frankly told me that yes it does happen. But if an Asian would to stand out in they're very own way, the opportunity of success will arise and it's definitely greater than any success you can achieve here in Malaysia. I mean come on...haven't you heard of Jimmy Choo?! LOL.

Anyway, to everyone that has read this blog and are currently living abroad or moving abroad soon, if you persevere and remain positive in all your undertakings, no matter where on earth you are, discrimination or not, you will definitely have a successful outcome. Cheer up and believe that things will always workout for you!

(Btw, I'm an asian too, a "chindian",chinese-indian,the ultimate asian combination and I'm enjoying the best of both worlds!)

Anonymous said...

hey! do you have a facebook account?

Anonymous said...

Chinese Malaysian?

Shouldn't that be Malaysian Chinese?

What a Freudian slip that was!

Some of us came back to help despite successfully integrating into American society.

Depends on your individual preference, upbringing and values.

Enjoy your new life dear and don't worry about us. Save your angst for people who care

Don't forget to refer to your kids as American Chinese now. ;)

my lucky star said...

impressed..

Anonymous said...

Simple, those who seeks straight no hanky panky paths, foreign land is the answer. For those who thinks crooked and knows the 'lubang's we have in Malaysia, it's indeed a land of opportunities and abundant wealth. Which tycoon or large corporate figures did not do it without 'lubang's? Whether it's the royalty members or strong political figures, they are the reason for our tycoons to love Malaysia. For the rest of Malaysians with no such talent nor fate, and are rigid with rules of life, forget about this barren land home, go migrate.

Our country need us said...

Everyone is migrating and moving out of this country(Malaysia), to run away all these injustice but how about those who are left behind? Those who are unable to do so?
Should't we stay and solve all these problems? We all know that"逃避是解决不了问题的" but in fact how many really stay and fight for the better future?
I believe change is on its way, but we our short-handed, we need more Malaysians to stand with us.
I want my younger generation proud to be a Malaysian and say out loud that Malaysia is "Negaraku"

huibee said...

I agree. That's why after 5+ years staying in the UK, I'm still thinking to go home. Because I know our country needs us, and whether or not I stay in the UK, will not really make any big difference.

That's a lot of faith we need. And it's not easy at all. Hence most people believe leaving is an easier route.

Anonymous said...

Hi. I would wanna check if I wanna work at US. What procedure must I go through and how?

Anonymous said...

Wow...I live in the USA and I know what you mean. I had the same Mathematician brain in Malaysia and it led me no where. Today, I am one of the top students here, doing TA with stipend and paying for my studies.

It's true that HARDWORK really pays in USA regardless your color, creed or race. In Malaysia, someone told me that I won't succeed because my name does not carry BINTI in it. How true!

Thanks for sharing this letter...I am glad that I was not the only one who felt like that.

Anonymous said...

I also noticed that some poeple were defensive. I dont think we are talking bad about Malaysia, but about how, we the Chinese and Indian do not get equal opportunities as the Malays. There are many great things about Malaysia that I am proud of...I love the harmony, the food, the multi-racial mixtures -- but when it comes to higher education and job, we, the Chinese and Indians will have be LUCKY to enter the University or be a CEO of a company. So, for those who are offended, really step into our shows before condemning USA.

I am not saying USA is perfect, but IT IS A LAND OF OPPORTUNITY! It lets you grow and never stops you from growing!

Anonymous said...

I'm half Chinese and half Malay. I could see the cultural differences between the two. My Chinese family are of super hard working type because for them the source of happiness is more to money and wealth.But my malay family is a little bit relax but they are not lazy, they work hard but not as super hard as Chinese. That makes the Malays n others are left behind in the race because the Chinese level of hardworking is superb. If you go to rural area like kedah, pahang, so many poor malays, even don't have food to eat while I can see a lot of Chinese tycoons, millionaires and super rich one in Malaysia. In fact, the Malaysian economy is conquered by Chinese. My malay friend who obtained 11A1 and 1A2 got rejected by JPA and few I have known who have excellent results in SPM got rejected as well. So I hope you'll not saying that Chinese in Malaysia get really bad treatments because Chinese people are far ahead in the race of business and wealth, so the government try to bring the bumiputra people closer by helping them if not the gap will be very big, and a lot more conflicts waiting ahead. I'm currently in USA and I met a lot of wealthy Malaysian Chinese students who come to study sponsored by their parents and for the medium and lower income Chinese, they are sponsored by JPA. So please be considerate to Malays & other Bumiputera too because they have to cope with the super hardworking Chinese in order to do well. I myself sometime get tired when I try to work as hard as Chinese.

huibee said...

Thank you for your comment. Given your background I thought you were going to tell me something more of a balanced view.

From my comprehension, it is too difficult for the Malays to catch up with the Chinese because the latter "work too hard". So those bad treatments as we call it were the results of the Chinese's over-hard work. Who would want to work hard if you can get satisfying life without any effort? Just like the British, they get benefits for all kind of causes, now look at the state, the economy, the unemployed rates of the country. So in your mind should the Chinese stop working hard so that the Malays could catch up? NO. That's kind of hilarious.

Over the six years I'm in the UK, I have encountered a number of Malays who were sponsored by "our" government, who came by Business class, got tuition fees, living expenses, being able to afford buying car, travel around europe whenever they want and still able to save money!! All paid by tax payers - you know who. Of course you're right, there are also Chinese who are there sponsored by their rich parents. But have you met those who are poor yet work so hard, came out with good results but got declined by the national universities?

Please allow myself to correct you, yes money and wealth are definitely important to an extend to lead a comfortable and easy life, but it is NOT the source of happiness for the Chinese. I'm disappointed with the fact that you're telling me one of your parents is a Chinese and you don't even understand Chinese people and our values.

Anyway I appreciate your comment. It's a platform of speech freedom and these are just my opinions. Wish you the best.

nani scude said...
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nani scude said...

Whenever we have dinner with my Chinese family,the topics are usually about money matters, business and related stuff, it is good, I don't see anything wrong. I don't say that Chinese has to stop working hard, but the way the Chinese express their discontents is like all the Malays are having an enjoyable and prosperous life due to the benefit given from government.Maybe if you spend some time visiting the rural area/kampung in Malaysia.See all the rumah setinggan, low cost flat houses, and see the majority of the residents are Chinese or Malays.From my opinion,It's like if you have 10 kids, you cannot give the same treatment to all. Few need more help while some are more independent. What I see in United States, due to equal opportunity system, the Black is really left behind. I rarely see Black people in school of engineering, medical school or CEO of companies. Most of them are left behind with education and the result is more crimes are committed by them. I also see what you mean that it is unfair for the hard working Chinese.Yeah, this issue has made me feel really complex because I am of both Chinese and Malay. So if you think you don't like the way the recent government treat the Chinese, the Chinese community need to voice out or change the government through election. That's the only way I can see.I am not bias or what,I love both my Chinese and Malay heritage.. but this is more from my observation that I met a lot of poor Malays in my life and they are less competitive than Chinese.

Anonymous said...

What you said is true, Huibee. I was among the best students that was denied an opportunity to study abroad merely because of my background and racial identity. Besides, I have also been denied entry into the government sector after I successfully graduated with a masters' degree in engineering from a local university, just because I am not a malay. Also, I was raised in a rural kampung area, surrounded by malays. I can comprehend the malay language much better than the english language. But no matter how fluent I can speak the national language, I am still being treated by the government as a 2nd class citizen. No matter how much that we have contributed to the growth of our nation, we will never receive the same treatment as what given to the malays. This is the fact that no one should hide. Please apologize my english, as I said, I am not a graduate from a foreign university.

Jonas said...
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Anonymous said...

What you said is true, Huibee. I was among the best students that was denied an opportunity to study abroad merely because of my background and racial identity. Besides, I have also been denied entry into the government sector after I successfully graduated with a masters' degree in engineering from a local university, just because I am not a malay. FYI, I was raised in a rural kampung area, surrounded by malays. I can comprehend the malay language much better than the english language. But no matter how fluent I can speak the national language, I am still being treated by the government as a 2nd class citizen. I can only become a government servant IN MY DREAM! No matter how much that we have contributed to the growth of our nation, we will never receive the same treatment as what received by the malays. This is the fact that no one should hide. Please pardon my english, as I said, I am not a graduate from a foreign university.

Shareen Chai said...

Hi huibee, Im shareen from Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia… I finish my study in secondary school then I work to get more working experiences and knowledge after that I take CAT account courses but I give up due to my exam fail on the first semester. Then I continue my work as a accountant in Brunei.. I stay in Brunei for 19 years and my parent been in Brunei for more than 30 years… I never decide to go back Malaysia and I really like to try a new life in USA… I love Malaysia but it hard for me to stay there… so what I’m trying to talking about is are you still staying in USA? I need your help there… I have no friends who know how life situation there… but then I saw your blog so I would like you to tell me how the life style there is? And I want to find job in USA is it possible for me to work there with out any higher educated and my English language is not that good …

KoK KeOnG said...

Not to disheartened you my dear, but getting a job for an immigrant here is extremely competitive for a foreign worker or student. Companies have to pay for visa sponsorship to hire foreign workers,so most of the time they only hire masters or phd student, or someone with excellent skill set and ability if you're a foreigner. tough luck but try your best!

Anonymous said...

I was so wow'ed I totally understand what you mean. I was a STPM student too. got good result for nothing. Local university fail to offer me a course that I want. Unbelievable. Whereas a Malay here is offer to do law degree with cgpa of 3.00. Law degree even for us Chinese Malaysian are very hard to get with a CGPA of 4.0. So disappointed. Finally no choice I enrol in a affordable private school here in Malaysia cause can't afford go other places. Plus, I think Malaysia is the only country that has a university called (UITM) solely accepting Malays and bumiputera. That's just racist. We Chinese Malaysian just don't seem to have a brighter future in education. So now I am working hard to get out of this country even though chances are small.

王大可 said...

By saying 'many chinese here in malaysia are rich' or 'S.O.M.E Malays are not that rich (live in rural areas etc.)' doesnn't justify that there isn't any discrimination in Malaysia. It's a generalisation. Besides discrimination can be specific. Us from Sarawak generally don't experience much racial discrimination here cuz most people just get along with each other.
But when it comes to a tertiary education opportunity offered by the government, I suppose there is. If equality in this case means every Malaysian citizen gets an equal chance for what's offered, then it doesn't exist here cuz it's obvious to see why non-Bumiputera students make up only less than 20% something in each public uni. I don't see how is that a coincident.
But that's the privilege given to the Bumiputeras, think I remember that from form 3 history text book? It's the deal made in order to achieve 'Merdeka', protected by the constitution something?

Anonymous said...
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Christina said...

Hi, I am currently a lower 6 student in Malaysia and it is my biggest dream to pursue my studies in the States. It is almost unreachable as I'm from a poor family and my parents can't afford it, not just the tuition fees but even the living fees. Can I know more about the MACEE thing that you mentioned? I mean, I really need your explanation to realize my wild dream. Great article by the way, left me feeling fulfilled and inspired after reading it. Thank you very much, couldn't be more grateful.

Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...

To all Malaysian Chinese that left for greener pastures overseas. Nothing has changed after all these years. Yes, I too left the country 35 years ago after my Form 6 HSC as it was called then for a chance to further my studies in the USA. Yes, I was also complaining about the unfair treatment then and even got to see thousands of bumi government students coming to the states colleges from the late 70's through the 80's. Yes, I too went through the similar struggles of life noted by the author. Looking back at all these trials and tribulation in life, it has made me a better person. As I get older, I tend to count my blessings more and more. We had the best of both worlds and we are successful. I now have an amazing family, life and career. If I had stayed back in a local University, I don't think I will have this same kind of life. What is past is past and I don't look back much anymore. The only thing I tend to look back at is the Malaysian food. Other than that, it is a foreign place for me now.

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Jonathan Fitzgerald said...

My wife is a Malay Malaysian and I am American. I do not want my only son to get involved I that sad sad mess in Malaysia. I think the problem with Malaysia is that the Malays are treated like children, whether it be the Arabs (Islam) or the Chinese. Two things must happen for piece in Malaysia. 1) religion must be a free choose for Malay Malaysians 2) the Malaysian language must become compulsory to all citizens especially Chinese citizens.

Anonymous said...

Is there a forum for malaysian who wish to migrate or had migrated?

Anonymous said...

I stumbled upon this, after reading yesterday's Cabinet reshuffle shortly after Wall Street exposed 'some incredible stories' on 1MDB (while investigation was ongoing). It is so so sad that this posting started in 2009 and reading through the trails, the situation did not improve since then instead gotten worse. The worse of Malaysia is coming....

Anonymous said...

while reading this post of yours...I'll admit, I'm jealous. there's no way to describe how inspiring and proud I am of u. u're what I would called a role model for me to change my life for the better. to be honest, I came from a middle-class family but aside from mostly everything is good in my life, there's this part of me that has been dying to live in America. although i do have a great education, I'm not those college student that u would categorize as the stereotypes. u know, involved in uni's activities, be in the known, know what's going on in the campus or anything that a "normal" student would get involved with. i'm a laid-back person that treat college/uni solely as a place to get the degree scroll, the place where i have to get done the quizzes, assignments, group projects and exams. that's all what college/uni means to me.

it had a lot to do with how unmotivated i am because of all that's happening inside me. the urge, the need, the rebellion to go to America. I don't have any sort of feelings towards Malaysia anymore. I just lost the emotion of caring towards my home country and replaced with unconditional love for America. for most people, they just thought i'm deluding myself with the idea of living the American dream. they make fun of me whenever I talk about it. well, i literally talk about it everyday so i think they're tired of hearing it but i can't help myself. it's a passion and dream of mine.

i totally sided with u on this discrimination thing. it's one of the negative things about Malaysia and suffice to say, I don't feel like Malaysia is my home anymore. i don't know how and when this epiphany came over me, the idea of realizing that maybe i'm just not like everyone else. i realize there's something arise in me that i want to change and i am changing. the fact that i get along better with Americans is one of the signs showing i belong there. in fact, i communicate and share ideas freely with them rather than my own colleagues. although it's not a face to face conversation, it just means i relate to them on such a high level that i don't even need to converse with them personally. we can get along easily through social media.

i am interested to further my study, doing master degree in USA in economics or business. i'll graduate in 2017 and i hope by 2018/2019 i have set my foot on the land of opportunity, the land of America.

i hope u can share ur journey with me like how do i get there, i saw u mentioned MACEE but from what i've read, u have to return to Malaysia after u have finished ur degree so i'm confused on how u get to continue ur stay at US. u made it seems so easy aside from what i've been researched on the internet. the paperwork, documents, interviews, visa, oh my...there's just a lot of work. just thinking about it make me reluctant whether i have the will to do all of that by myself. i don't know if i have what it takes to be that great, that independent and so "adult" thing i would say. sometimes i looked back, cherishing the moment when i was a kid, life is so much easier and now i have to wrap my mind around the reality of living as an adult and still..i'm working on it. everyday.

i hope u don't mind sharing ur experience with me, if u could tell me the details of what i have to do to be where u're at, to live the life that i've always want just like u did, it would mean a lot to me and i thank u for u have written this post, sharing one of ur great life experince with us. thank u ^_^

nurul diyanah md zaidan said...

I am a Malay girl, will be graduating this October from one of the top 5 local universities. I have to say that, I agree and I'm aware of what's happening right now regarding "race discrimination". I somewhat adore Singapore way of living in community. They often call themselves Singaporean instead of malay-in-singapore. I love the idea of "satu bangsa". We're all Malaysian. Not malay not chinese not indian not bumiputra. Of course, that was my point of view. As a malay myself I think we've been spoiled by so many special treatments and somehow are relaxing in the comfort zone and too lazy to compete. I think a healthy competition is a great thing. Good for the economy. Government should help whoever deserves the help. Equality. I hope for a better Malaysia.

Anonymous said...

Contrary to popular belief, many Malays also work hard. Many Malay students study till late night and weekend. Many Malay workers working till late night. Malays are not so successful economically are because the population of Malays are small. If Malays have 1 billion population, Malays will have the economic power. Another factor is most Malays distance themselves from the usage of genie. If God allows the usage of genie, Malays will become good in business.

Anonymous said...

I opined that you try opening a business, and compete with non-Malays. Then only you know.

Anonymous said...

USA economy is based on debt. It is a debt economy. They borrow till they cannot pay. Due to large amount of money around, it is easier to make money in US. However, majority Malay students prefer to come back to Malaysia due to many factors, culture, relatives, weather, insurance (too expensive, in Malaysia hospital charge is almost free), etc.

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